Immigration smimmigration

"If you choose the red pill, then I'll show you just how deep the rabbit hole goes. But then we're going to stop releasing people from the Matrix. We're worried about wage effects in Zion."

“If you choose the red pill, then I’ll show you just how deep the rabbit hole goes. But then we’re going to stop releasing people from the Matrix. We’re worried about wage effects in Zion.”

Paul Collier writes about immigration for Bloomberg. I’m sure we’re only a matter of minutes away from some very serious commentary from the folks at CGD or from Roving Bandit, but here are a few of my own thoughts.

Firstly, Collier argues that new immigration inevitably will hurt the status of the recently-migrated, even if it does not hurt the native population:

The answer is that those who have already migrated lose, at least in economic terms, through the subsequent migration of others. Migrants lose because they compete with one another.

Migrants aren’t in close competition with indigenous workers. The advantage the indigenous have may be that they have better command of the language or that their greater tacit knowledge of social conventions makes them more productive.

The effects of immigration on the wages of indigenous workers vary between very small losses and modest gains. If immigration policy were to be set by its effects upon wages, the only interest group to campaign for tighter restrictions should be immigrants.

The individual behavior of immigrants evidently belies this interest: Immigrants typically devote considerable effort to trying to get visas for their relatives. But these two interests aren’t inconsistent.

An immigrant who enables a relative to join her receives benefits such as companionship. The increased competition in the job market generated by the extra migrant is suffered by other immigrants. In effect, a tightening of immigration restrictions would be a public good for the existing immigrant community as a whole.

So immigration doesn’t hurt the`indigenous’ population, but will hurt new migrants? Solution: every country in the world allows just one immigrant in its borders, then closes them forever. Seriously, it is unclear here what Collier’s assumed social welfare function is.* It’s perfectly understandable why immigration restrictions might be endogenous to levels of migration, but I’m struggling to recall any high-profile cases of recent-migrants calling for a curb on future migration.**

If we cared about general welfare and not just that of recent migrants, loosening restrictions are a bit of a no-brainer. Yes, it might depress wages in the short run for other migrants (evidence?) but compared against the enormous welfare benefits from the migration itself, this is really a second-order concern (a bit like arguing that we shouldn’t let anyone else into the life-boat because, damn it, it will be less comfortable).

Next, Collier argues that new immigration creates another set of externalities on existing migrants: more hate

There may be further social reasons that the existing stock of immigrants has an interest in tighter restrictions. The size of the immigrant stock also affects attitudes of the indigenous population. Contrary to the hope that exposure increases tolerance, the opposite appears to happen.

Heightened intolerance is a public bad suffered by immigrants as a whole, and is thus inadvertently generated by the individually maximizing migration decisions of each successive migrant. Hence, the paradox of migration. Individual migrants succeed in capturing the huge productivity gains from migration. But migrants collectively have an interest in precisely what individually is most detrimental: entry barriers.

Haters gonna hate – and haters gonna hate even more when there are more immigrants around, apparently. Again, no evidence is given to support this case. While I do think there is a worthwhile conversation to be had about how immigrants integrate into societies and how best to maintain social cohesion, falling back on the “We, the indigenous, are inherently racist, and are just going to get more racist as more foreigners show up and there’s nothing to be done about it” argument seems a bit silly.

Finally, Collier argues that migrants might not actually be that much happier and that, combined with the psychological cost of being in a new culture, immigration might be a bad deal. He turns to evidence from several studies showing happiness doesn’t increase when people are allowed to migrate.

This seems to me to be a better argument against using happiness as a welfare indicator, rather than against migration itself. It also leaves us with an entirely unsatisfactory explanation for current migration: that people are deluded about the benefits and would have preferred never to have traveled in the first place. This is particularly hard to swallow in an era where information is particularly cheap – it is relatively easy to send information back to one’s friends and family to clarify that, actually, it isn’t as cool here as I thought it was going to be.

In general, these feel like highly theoretical, armchair rationales for limiting migration. Surely we’ve moved past this by now?

 

*Update #1: To clarify, I mean the SWF Collier is using to make his case, not necessarily his personal preferences over migration!

**Update #2: a friend noted (via e-mail) that this is historically quite common – waves of immigrants turn around and try to stop the next group from landing. While I’d conceded that former-immigrants tend to resist those coming from a different national/ethnic origin, are there any cases where immigrants tried to close the door on immigration from their own country of origin?

2 thoughts on “Immigration smimmigration

  1. Rebecca

    August 31, 2013 at 12:44pm

    Interesting response — thanks.
    There are examples. The one I can think of off the top of my head is that the first wave of Jewish immigrants was upset by later waves. They felt they had successfully integrated and new, un-assimilated Jews hurt their image.
    In addition, measuring the happiness only of the immigrant seems to ignore a huge component of the welfare benefits. Many migrants willingly put themselves in unpleasant circumstances in order to maximize remittances. Of course they’re not super excited to share a small apartment with several other migrants or to work long hours, but revealed preferences shows that it’s not just their own happiness that they’re attempting to maximize, so why would we measure them just on that scale?
    Rebecca

  2. MJ

    September 12, 2013 at 1:55pm

    Just because we find something morally repugnant does not mean we should ignore its existence when considering public policy. I.e. I am not sure that, in itself, considering the impact of more immigrants on the attitudes of the indigenous towards existing immigrants is so bad, nor should it be equated with waving the white flag on racism. There is a valid question as to whether this line of argument, which makes intuitive sense to me, is indeed borne out by evidence, which you correctly call for.

    But perhaps more importantly I suspect most migrants would not favour immigration controls as the solution. So maybe the real beneficiaries would be the indigenous population who would not be so frequently embarrassed about stories of their countrymen’s racist attitudes.

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