The ultimate Monopoly strategy and the British housing shortage

monopoly

Over at imgur, someone has discovered a Monopoly strategy that will not only let you win, but will also make the other players hate you:

A little-known rule of Monopoly is that the game has exactly 32 houses and 12 hotels. Once you run out of houses, no more can be purchased until they re-enter the supply by being sold or upgraded to hotels. If there are more players who want to build houses than there are houses available, they are auctioned off to the highest bidder, one at a time. The core of this strategy is to buy up as many houses as possible before anyone realizes what you’re doing, and DO NOT UPGRADE TO HOTELS to prevent people from improving their own properties.

Basically, you need to create several monopolies very quick and just focus on buying up all the available houses the game provides. Once there are no more houses, your friends can’t advance and so you’ll win, slowly and painfully.

Everyone suffers in this scenario, except for the lucky person who rushed their way onto the housing ladder. But note that the reason this strategy works and the first-mover will eat up all the resulting rent is because Monopoly has a purely arbitrary rule on the supply of housing. This is not a million miles away from the unnecessary planning restrictions which make it harder to build or upgrade in the UK and thus make land and housing far more expensive than they need to be.

Hate tip to kottke.org

The property ladder here and there

Once plentiful, land has become scarce, and competition fierce. The district population has been growing fast………. Youths struggle to find any land to sustain their new families. In some villages, it is difficult to get even one hectare. In the village of Amanikrom a young man eager to farm could only get a fifth of a hectare. So the landless youth work their way up by starting as labourers or sharecroppers. In the past, sharecropping attracted migrants only from other parts of the country. Today, young members of the landowning family have to resort to sharecropping too. Meanwhile, much land is in the hands of absentee landlords who work in Accra and use part of their wages to pay for agricultural labourers.

That is from Lorenzo Cotula’s recent book on land grabbing in Africa. For those of you who consider this to be a third world problem: read the segment above one more time, but replace “land” with “housing”, “fifth of a hectare” with “studio apartment”, “sharecropping” with “renting”, and “agricultural labourers” with “council-approved extensions.”